How to insert emoji into R and R Markdown

When installing a picture or graphic into your RMArkdown file, be aware of the specific parameters that make your character unique. The code to pull a specific character from a library such as GitHub is relatively straightforward:
devtools::install_github(“spiral/emo”)
followed by your character’s name or relating keyword, in this case, spiral. Know that when you use a general word you will tell the R function to give you an associated value at random. Libraries of graphics can contain hundreds of cues for specific pictures, so assigning favored characters their own identifier is advised for the sake of expediency.
While not a relatively complex problem, there have been noted issues by programmers on different operating systems with their call up of the emote features on their developer toolset. Users of the graphic tool ggplot noted such issues when they want to utilize an emoji package and the function won’t recognize the commands.
This user put in for an graphics package with the following code:
ggplot(data=dat, aes(emoji_name, n)) +
geom_bar(stat = “identity”) +
scale_x_discrete(breaks = dat$emoji_name, labels = dat$emoji) +
coord_flip()
but found the ggplot function wouldn’t accept the values. There’s more than one answer to this problem, one being to use a different library. Here is a popular R function package that gives the graphics without color:
ggplot(data=dat, aes(emoji_name, n)) +
geom_bar(stat = “identity”) +
scale_x_discrete(breaks = dat$emoji_name, labels = dat$emoji) +
theme( axis.text.y =element_text( size=20 ) ) +
coord_flip()
but another work around is to use a different function to recognize and insert names of characters summoned by the function,
dat tibble(names = c(“smile”,”school”,”office”,”blush”,”smirk”,”heart_eyes”),
emoji = map_chr(names, emo::ji)) %>%
tibble::rowid_to_column(“n”)
Depending on what functions in R you prefer using, there can be multiple solutions to getting emojis included.
Other times it may just be specific R graphics packages that work with your system in R more than others. Many users find that they can access and implement keywords for graphic value inputs with a picture or character font-specific package. R users and Github commentators both note that they see different dev tools, so when it seems like the package you’re trying to implement isn’t working, try and change the specifics before fully redoing your entire command line.
All this may seem overwhelming, but don’t forget that in the end, you should only put in as much effort as you enjoy doing. Putting graphics and visuals is as much about expressing your own view as conveying information to your audience. There are many functions in R markdown that allow for full customization of your presentation, not just with emote icons but a wide span of graphical details from the simple heading fonts to full-blown videos to set reference points relatable to everyday life. Once confident in implementing your array of characters for graphical model interpretation, look to push the envelope for your next presentation and really capture your audience’s attention with some exciting exclamations. The only limit to what your can program in R is your imagination.

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